The Pawsh Dog - Flying Can Be Stressful for Dogs Dogs
Flying can be stressful for dogs

We all know that travelling can be a stressful experience for anyone, but trying to fly with your dog is a completely different thing. There are several reasons why it’s suggested you should not fly with your dog. Flying has been shown to be stressful for many domestic animal species like dogs. It is especially stressful for crated dogs flying in the cargo hold during the loading and unloading periods.

If you have to fly with your pooch, follow these concepts to reduce  the personal stress that your dog is feeling.

How to Reduce the Stress
Wherever possible, drive your dog to the travel destination or opt for alternative specialty boarding places as a treat for your pooch. There are dog hotels now that not only allow dogs, but cater to them in luxury.

However, if it is really needed to go on plane, flying in the cabin is much less stressful, but only available to very small dogs who can fit in a carrier under the seat. Reduce your Pooch’s stress while travelling on the plane with these simple solutions.

Do your research on airlines with the best record of safe pet travel.

  • Look for non-stop flights with no transfers.  
  • Avoid flying during holiday seasons when airlines are busier than normal.
  • Don’t fly them in late summer or winter, cargo temps aren’t reliably comfortable temp-wise.
  • Make sure the carrier door is secure, and clean and in good condition. 
  • If your dog is difficult, fearful or nervous – consult with a Vetranarian to acquire some subtle medication.
  • Check on them regularly during  connection flight times. 
  • Keep any contact numbers of the airline, and ensure they have yours in case of emergency. 
  • Make sure animal is microchipped, and collar-tagged, plus carrier tagged

Pick up Your Dog as Soon as You Arrive at Your Destination 
When you arrive, collect your checked bags and proceed to your airline’s designated cargo site. According to airlines, dogs are usually available two hours after the flight arrives, and they must be picked up within four hours or they will be transported to a veterinarian or boarding facility. 

If you know what can make your dog nervous before they board the plane, it will be much easier to avoid those situations while travelling, making their experience much more enjoyable.

Noise Level :
The noise from the motors and any other individuals in close proximity to you can be a lot for your pup. If they are already nervous before takeoff, the loud confusing noises around them exacerbate their anxiety.

The Force of Air
The shift in air pressure that might occur when flying will generate stress on your dog’s ears (pooping in the ears), but this should pass momentarily.

Body Temperature 
If your dog is too hot or cold, he or she will most likely be stressed. So bring stuff that will help them stay cool, and if they have a favourite blanket, make sure you carry it.

Unusual Smells
Remember that dogs have a far stronger sense of smell than humans do. It is critical not to introduce them to unfamiliar odours while travelling, as this may induce stress. 

Prepare Your Dog Ahead of Time  
Before flying with your pet, always consult with your veterinarian concerning food, drink, and medication. Experts are split on whether you should sedate or tranquillize your pets before the flight. It’s up to you to assess the advantages and cons with a professional who is familiar with you and your animal. Also, be aware that sedation has health concerns, and some airlines prohibit sedation or require a veterinarian’s note.

Pick up Your Dog as Soon as You Arrive at Your Destination 
When you arrive, collect your checked bags and proceed to your airline’s designated cargo site. According to airlines, dogs are usually available two hours after the flight arrives, and they must be picked up within four hours or they will be transported to a veterinarian or boarding facility. 

Trained Dogs are Less Stressful While Travelling in Plane
Dogs that are trained to spend long periods in their crate, like Military or Police Working Dogs, do fine with air transport. But a family pet that is not used to the confinement and handling  can be incredibly stressful while travelling on the plane. 

The Pawsh Dog - Flying Can Be Stressful for Your Dog